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MichiganReptiles
06-01-2010, 07:07 PM
OK. so I read in a few places that humidity wasn't an issue for A. Geniculata, but now I'm reading other places that they need high humidity. Of course I have a small lid of water in there (because it's a tiny little 1" guy) but I guess if they require 80% humidity I should mist daily too, eh? Do you remove the T before you mist? I mist my reptiles all the time, but they don't mind getting wet. I don't want to irritate my cute little genic :)

Thanks.

Scoolman
06-01-2010, 07:43 PM
OK. so I read in a few places that humidity wasn't an issue for A. Geniculata, but now I'm reading other places that they need high humidity. Of course I have a small lid of water in there (because it's a tiny little 1" guy) but I guess if they require 80% humidity I should mist daily too, eh? Do you remove the T before you mist? I mist my reptiles all the time, but they don't mind getting wet. I don't want to irritate my cute little genic :)

Thanks.

You will get many replies about how to mist properly. i am going to tell it is a futile effort.
"...spraying or misting a tarantula's cage to increase humidity is mostly an exercise in futility and a waste of time and effort." -- Schultz and Schultz The Tarantula Keepers Guide

If you do a little studying on air flow and weather patterns you will quickly find this to be true.
If you have an open enclosure, allowing for good air flow between the enclosure and the outside air, the mist you spray will quickly evaporate, being assimilated into the outside air, and the air in the enclosure will match that of the air outside. Not to mention, it will annoy and stress your tarantula. Unlike your reptiles, tarantulas prefer not to be wet.
If you have a closed enclosure restricting air flow, the water dish will evaporate and be trapped in the enclosure which in turn will raise the humidity.
Keep in mind that reduced air flow also encourages mold growth, while increased air flow reduces humidity; it is a balancing act to say the least.
I recommend you find that sweet spot that will allow for good air flow but, restrict it enough to hold the humidity.

Just my 12 cents.

Arachnoholic420
06-01-2010, 07:44 PM
Just mist on the opposite side of where your T stays in her enclosure.....;)
thats all...all little mist wont hurt her.... as long as you dont soak her with it.... you should be fine... i mist all arround mine's....

Slappys_g1rl06
06-01-2010, 07:59 PM
I mist but not for the purpose of humidity (I think my slings will drink the droplets:o I wonder if it's just a comfort thing for me). But yeah, when misting... don't spray the t. Spray the other side of the cage. To keep the humidity up, I received a great suggestion from TalonAWD; he suggested using a large needle to put moisture under the substrate. Seems to work for me so far! But it's only been a week!

smallara98
06-01-2010, 08:24 PM
I usually spray the sides, with my versicolor. And the leaves and soil, but same with genics. BUT NOT DAILY. Usually 2 times a week would be just fine. How you have fun with the little guy :)

Scoolman
06-01-2010, 08:31 PM
I mist but not for the purpose of humidity (I think my slings will drink the droplets:o I wonder if it's just a comfort thing for me). But yeah, when misting... don't spray the t. Spray the other side of the cage. To keep the humidity up, I received a great suggestion from TalonAWD; he suggested using a large needle to put moisture under the substrate. Seems to work for me so far! But it's only been a week!

A baster works great to inject water deep into the sub while keeping the surface dry. I use this method myself. If sub is moist down deep the moisture will rise and evaporate into the enclosure maintaining a stable humidity level.

AbraCadaver
06-01-2010, 08:38 PM
I mostly only mist my slings and pre-molt babies. This is of the humid species, not the dry ones, obviously. I too live under the assumption they drink of the droplets. With my humid arboreals over 6cm, I just place a large waterbowl. The humidity from this is more than enough, when they stand in the cupboard.

At the moment, ALL my T's are in pre-molt (I know, what the heck?) and I've seen them all hanging out by their water dishes, so I boiled some water, put it in a bowl and stuck it in the cupboard. This got the humidity up a bit, with the steam of the water, without mucking up the enclosures, as Ive had some mold issues in a couple of them.

Scoolman
06-01-2010, 08:51 PM
When I housed my 1/2" G pulchra (who are now 1" and still in the same enclosure) I put int in a mixture of coco choir and pete humus that was moist, packed it firmly and added a layer of dry coco choir to the top. I have never had to adjust humidity over the past 4 months. I just top of the water dish, which is a cap from a 12oz water bottle.

MichiganReptiles
06-01-2010, 09:06 PM
Thanks for all of your replies. Since I have the little guy in the smallest KK it's not easy to "mist one side" without getting him in the process. The KK has the vents in the top so the ventilation should be ok, right? There is good air circulation in the room they are in; I don't have them put away anywhere. So do I just rely on the water dish to provide humidity?

If I injected water deep in the substrate, wouldn't that cause mold issues as well?

Scoolman
06-01-2010, 09:17 PM
Thanks for all of your replies. Since I have the little guy in the smallest KK it's not easy to "mist one side" without getting him in the process. The KK has the vents in the top so the ventilation should be ok, right? There is good air circulation in the room they are in; I don't have them put away anywhere. So do I just rely on the water dish to provide humidity?

If I injected water deep in the substrate, wouldn't that cause mold issues as well?

Only add enough water to moisten the sub, not create a swamp. I if have water in the bottom that is not absorbed by the substrate then you have put far too much. The substrate should always quickly absorb any water you add.

xhexdx
06-01-2010, 09:45 PM
Misting is more for arboreals and more so they can drink the water droplets from the sides of the enclosure.

If you want high humidity, keep the water dishes full and keep some of the substrate damp.

Most of the other responses have already covered it all anyway.

MichiganReptiles
06-01-2010, 10:59 PM
Misting is more for arboreals and more so they can drink the water droplets from the sides of the enclosure.

If you want high humidity, keep the water dishes full and keep some of the substrate damp.

Most of the other responses have already covered it all anyway.

Are you just naturally cranky?

MichiganReptiles
06-01-2010, 11:00 PM
Only add enough water to moisten the sub, not create a swamp. I if have water in the bottom that is not absorbed by the substrate then you have put far too much. The substrate should always quickly absorb any water you add.

Thank you for your help. I greatly appreciate it.

Shell
06-01-2010, 11:16 PM
Are you just naturally cranky?

I don't see how that was cranky at all. Joe gave you his opinion based off experiences and acknowledged that most of it had been covered already. Nothing cranky there, however with people responding to him like that I can understand how one would get cranky.

AbraCadaver
06-01-2010, 11:32 PM
In all fairness, Joe does have a record of being blunt and straightforward, it can be misinterpreted for rudeness through a computer screen. When I first started posting here, I found Joe to be a bit of a toe rag(no offence=p), but after some time I realized that no matter how blunt, straight forward and rude it may seem, he's pretty much always right, and a great asset to the hobby and this site.. So if you just look past the blunt tone in the posts, and use the info, you'll find you come to like him much better.. =p

xhexdx
06-02-2010, 05:58 AM
What exactly was 'cranky' about that post?

MichiganReptiles
06-02-2010, 06:21 AM
Most of the other responses have already covered it all anyway.

That was the cranky part.

I just wanted to make sure I understood things clearly. I don't see a problem with that. and apparently no one else was bothered by it.

Sometimes (a lot of times from what I've read) you add things that really aren't necessary and seem rude. There are new people here all the time and it seems to bother you when we ask questions that you think are silly because you've been here so long or because we should use the search function and spend three hours looking for the answer, but the whole point of having a forum to come to is to meet others and be able to "talk" to other people - not just sit here all day and use the search option.

But thanks for your time.

Slappys_g1rl06
06-02-2010, 06:56 AM
A baster works great to inject water deep into the sub while keeping the surface dry. I use this method myself. If sub is moist down deep the moisture will rise and evaporate into the enclosure maintaining a stable humidity level.

Haha, baster!!! I'm such a dork! I couldn't think of that word!!!! :?:o

But yeah... Also, I was told mites can't physically burrow to the water if you inject it a good ways under the sub. There's a really informative post on mites, that may tell you specs about thier burrowing capabilities, but you'll have to search for it. It appears numerous times from a guy with either Rev. or Reverend in his screen name.

jezzy607
06-02-2010, 07:47 AM
Misting seems to agitate my T's so I haven't misted in 7 years or so. I just keep the substrate moist but not wet (generally). Surprisingly I have not had mite issues, but I do have harmless collembola. I only keep terrestrials right now.

Shell
06-02-2010, 07:50 AM
That was the cranky part.

I just wanted to make sure I understood things clearly. I don't see a problem with that. and apparently no one else was bothered by it.



Joe didn't post that because he had a problem with other people replying or you looking for more info. That statement was meant about his own post, just saying "here's some info, although other people covered what I said already" acknowledging that he was repeating other people. Lots of people will do that when they post here, the difference is, so many people think that Joe being honest and to the point means that he's a jerk, which isn't true, but they tend to get their back up whenever he posts. Not fair to him or them, as if you took the time to listen to him, you could learn alot.

Anyway, that's just how I took his post, if I'm wrong, you may correct me Joe ;)

MichiganReptiles
06-02-2010, 08:19 AM
Perhaps I did misunderstand and if that is the case I am sorry for saying anything. I do acknowledge that he is filled with a lot of very useful information and I do read his posts. I've just noticed that he sometimes throws in a "dig" when talking to some people so I assumed the worst.

Shell
06-02-2010, 08:29 AM
If you want high humidity, keep the water dishes full and keep some of the substrate damp.



Just so I actually stay on topic here, I will say that this is exactly what I do with those of mine who need higher humidity. I will mist my avics and slings once a week or so, but use this method to actually keep humidity up for those that need it.

MichiganReptiles
06-02-2010, 08:49 AM
Thanks. Will do :)

xhexdx
06-02-2010, 09:10 AM
\That statement was meant about his own post, just saying "here's some info, although other people covered what I said already" acknowledging that he was repeating other people.

Anyway, that's just how I took his post, if I'm wrong, you may correct me Joe ;)

Bingo .

shanebp
06-02-2010, 06:25 PM
Like someone else already mentioned, I only mist my pre-molts and slings (because thats all I have lol). Mainly to keep the slings from dehydration as I had a sling die in the past from dehydration and to prevent getting stuck in a molt. I've watched my slings climb around and what seemed like drinking water from the droplets. Personally, I mist a couple times a week and keep the substrate moist. Thats pretty much all thats too it.

fretman08
07-02-2010, 11:13 AM
I do it every other day lightly.

fartkowski
07-02-2010, 03:29 PM
I don't mist at all.
I think it's a waste of time.
I agree with Joe, just keep a bit of the substrate moist, and the water dish full.
You could also just use a bigger water dish.

MichiganReptiles
07-02-2010, 04:16 PM
Um.. hello.. this post is a month old. I've figured it out by now. Thanks. ;)

fartkowski
07-02-2010, 04:18 PM
Hi
You never know:rolleyes:

MichiganReptiles
07-02-2010, 04:19 PM
Hi
You never know:rolleyes:

LOL. seems as though someone (fretman) is so bored that all old posts are being bumped to the front page.

Stan Schultz
07-03-2010, 08:02 PM
... So do I just rely on the water dish to provide humidity? ...

Not entirely. You also need to restrict ventilation a lot or all your precious humidity will merely escape out into the room.

Instead of a KK I'd recommend keeping it in something that would allow for restricting ventilation a lot more easily. Here are some suggestions depending on the tarantula's size.

http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/7510/babybottles02rr9.jpg (http://img229.imageshack.us/i/babybottles02rr9.jpg/)
Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

For a tarantula with a 1" leg span the pint (500 ml) canning jar would be about right. Note only a few holes in the lid. Merely keep the substrate slightly damp.

A 1" tarantula is too small for you (not the spider!) to benefit from or appreciate a formal cage, complete with decorations, play-toys, and fancy wallpaper. (As a parallel example, few if any humans can remember what their nursery looked like when they were babies.) Don't get carried away with the cutesy-pie furnishings.

At about twice its current size (approximately 1-1/2 to 2", 4 to 5 cm) you can start allowing it to dry out over a period of two or three molts. It will develop a waxy layer on its body that prevents it from desiccating between drinks from the (obligatory) water dish. Thereafter you care for it as an adult.


... If I injected water deep in the substrate, wouldn't that cause mold issues as well?

Mold is not the issue. The molds that people complain about are generally harmless to tarantulas. What you need to worry about are mites which are a huge threat. (Just ask someone who's suffered from them!)

As a tarantula grows from second instar (rarely third) as it leaves the eggsac until it's developed the waxy layer it needs to be kept in a slightly damp container to prevent desiccation. That dampness automatically opens it to the threat of mites. Your only defense is to check it once a week (usually while feeding it) and switch the spiderling to a new, clean container if you have any doubts at all about mites. Be sure to clean the old container well, and set it up, ready for another fast switch in case you need it later.

If you're a newbie, maybe you should read http://people.ucalgary.ca/~schultz/stansrant.html too.

Genics are great spiders. Enjoy!