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View Full Version : A calm baboon



TheWall
07-14-2005, 08:48 PM
My baboon is really calm compared to what most seem like. Thought I would share.
Pterinochilus murinus
http://thereptileroom.org/forum_gallery/albums/userpics/10356/evilbest.jpg

Joe1968
07-14-2005, 10:41 PM
nice pic.

really OBT arent that bad like most people want you to believed, mine is calm too. my A seemani is more defensive than my OBT.

Nick_schembri
07-14-2005, 11:27 PM
My OBT is very defensive, but its mood is very variable. One day she might treat me like a tree and climb up my arm without biting, and sometimes it just flips over in a threat pose with fangs stickin' out, promising a bite to any intruders.

Nick_schembri
07-14-2005, 11:31 PM
And she means business!

WhyTeDraGon
07-15-2005, 08:56 AM
Mine too!
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y80/WhyTeDraGon/Tarantulas/P%20murinus/Sling/Pmurinus1.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y80/WhyTeDraGon/Tarantulas/P%20murinus/Male/DSCF0030.jpg

Mine seem to be nasty all of the time, especially the female. Though, I havent tried picking them up, of course :)

Anyway, very nice OBT!

TheWall
07-15-2005, 10:39 AM
My little one lets me rub its rump. LOL It kinda likes it and doesn't leave any hairs. Strange things they are...

becca81
07-15-2005, 04:53 PM
While it may occasionally tolerate you touching it, remember that it is unpredictable and could feel threatened at any moment. I have three and they are more nervous than defensive.

Also, you probably want to consider changing the substrate in your enclosure. Wood chips aren't really recommended and it is next to impossible for the spider to burrow in it.

Dr Pies
07-15-2005, 05:04 PM
While it may occasionally tolerate you touching it, remember that it is unpredictable and could feel threatened at any moment. I have three and they are more nervous than defensive.

I have to disagree with you there Becca(for the first time;)). I think tarantulas are the most predictable pet you could ever have.

becca81
07-15-2005, 05:58 PM
I have to disagree with you there Becca(for the first time;)). I think tarantulas are the most predictable pet you could ever have.

Really? Please elaborate on how the behaviors of a wild animal are predictable.

Dr Pies
07-15-2005, 06:16 PM
Really? Please elaborate on how the behaviors of a wild animal are predictable.

What makes you think that a wild animal can be unpredictable?

If you had asked me without sounding <beep>, then I'd be glad to oblige.

EDIT: watch the language

Beardo
07-15-2005, 06:35 PM
What makes you think that a wild animal can be unpredictable?

LOL! You're kidding right? Ask Sigfried and Roy if they think wild animals can be unpredictable.

Dr Pies
07-15-2005, 06:52 PM
LOL! You're kidding right? Ask Sigfried and Roy if they think wild animals can be unpredictable.
Lets just to stick to tarantulas..

The baboon spider was said to be unpredictable, I dont think it is.

edesign
07-15-2005, 08:26 PM
Lets just to stick to tarantulas..

The baboon spider was said to be unpredictable, I dont think it is.

if you say so...some days mine is calm as hell, sometimes it attempts to kill me if i so much as breath in it's tank. how is that predictable?


My little one lets me rub its rump. LOL It kinda likes it and doesn't leave any hairs. Strange things they are...
mmm...how much research did you do on this species before you bought it? This is an Old World tarantula...they do not have urticating hairs like New World T's do, i would hope it doesn't leave any hairs on you. Hope you're quick cuz when it gets older...might have to test them reflexes ;) Although, with that coloration I'd be inclined to think it should be showing some defensiveness by now. Wacky T! :P

aaronrefalo
07-16-2005, 04:44 AM
i once had seen a approx 6" OBT...it was great...espacially there hissing sound i like that

Aaron

Nick_schembri
07-16-2005, 04:52 AM
The OBT in my pic is very unpredictable. She can run like orange lightening, or she can decide to attack. If tou can call that unpredictable

aaronrefalo
07-16-2005, 04:57 AM
The OBT in my pic is very unpredictable. She can run like orange lightening, or she can decide to attack. If tou can call that unpredictable

i dont know....unpredictable?!!...with OBT you always can predict whats going to happen...

Aaron

becca81
07-16-2005, 08:08 AM
I know I shouldn't even bother responding, but I am floored at how it has been said that a tarantula (a non-domesticated wild animal) can be considered predictable.

The only thing I find completely predictable about them is that one day they will die. They respond to stimuli in their environment with instinct, not with higher-level thinking skills. Even species that are known to generally be docile can suddenly be aggressive - you can't predict what type of behaviors may occur and by what they will feel threatened.

A tarantula that tolerates being handled, touched, or having tongs near its burrow one day may not tolerate it the next day (or the next second). Even when we generalize about the temperment of a certain species, there are always exceptions (the aggressive G. rosea, the docile H. maculata).

Dr Pies
07-16-2005, 08:20 AM
It floors me too and how someone with supposed experience thinks they aren't predictable.
Tarantula's always follow a pattern of behaviour that I and others have seen through over a decade of keeping them.
Experts have remarked on it, and amateur keepers have remarked on it.

I guess we are all wrong. :rolleyes:

becca81
07-16-2005, 08:32 AM
It floors me too and how someone with supposed experience thinks they aren't predictable.
Tarantula's always follow a pattern of behaviour that I and others have seen through over a decade of keeping them.



Yes there are some behavior that tarantulas will exhibit and others they will not. However, the pattern in which they exhibit these behaviors is not regular. They will typically show "warning signs" when they are feeling threatened before using defensive behavior. However, they will sometimes display different warning signs (or none at all) and go straight for the defensive behavior.

For example - if I am rehousing my T. blondi, I know that it is feeling stressed and will become defensive if I attempt to move it with the paintbrush and it doesn't move, planting its legs in the substrate. If I continue trying to prod it, it will begin kicking hairs, go into a threat pose, or attempt to strike the paintbrush. If it always followed this pattern of behavior I would consider it predictable.

However, there have been times when it has *not* followed this pattern. It is moving along nicely with the paintbrush, exhibiting signs of not being stressed, when it suddenly turns, strikes the paintbrush and/or begans suddenly kicking hairs. There are times when it does this just by the the paintbrush coming near it, or me opening the enclosure and doing maintenance near it.

There are a range of predictable behaviors that we know tarantulas will display (they're not going to suddenly begin singing and dancing the Macarena, for example). However, when they display these behaviors is not predictable.

When the thread-starter touches his P. murinus on the abdomen, there are several different reactions that the spider could have. It could tolerate it, it could slowly move away, it could run away, it could gather its legs together, it could turn and give a threat display, it could turn and bite the intruder, etc. There is no way of knowing which of these behaviors that the spider will display when being touched. Even when you think you "know" a particular tarantula, that doesn't mean that it couldn't suddenly change it's normal MO.

Nick_schembri
07-16-2005, 10:18 AM
I agree with Becca, they are unpredictable, generally when it involves human interaction, since if left alone tarantulas seem to follow a daily pattern. As I said before I dont always get the same response from my OBT. so, yes, I say unpredictable

Code Monkey
07-16-2005, 10:30 AM
There are a range of predictable behaviors that we know tarantulas will display (they're not going to suddenly begin singing and dancing the Macarena, for example). However, when they display these behaviors is not predictable.
<devil's advocate moment>
Depending on how you want to look at it, this could be seen as being wholely predictable. Not saying that is what DP had in mind, but I generally would consider Ts to be extremely predictable even though I agree 100% with the above statement. I know I'm going to get behaviour A, B, or C and I've got a feel for the probabilities of each; that is predictability of a kind, particularly since the range of possible behaviours is so limited.
</devil's advocate>

Dr Pies
07-16-2005, 10:41 AM
They respond to stimuli in their environment with instinct, not with higher-level thinking skills.

Which proves the point. With experience you can predict their movements on the stimulus you provide to them. If one day the tarantula decides to attack rather than run for cover, something is being done different to provoke a different reaction. You give tarantulas far too much credit in their thinking capacity.

Code Monkey
07-16-2005, 10:47 AM
Which proves the point. With experience you can predict their movements on the stimulus you provide to them. If one day the tarantula decides to attack rather than run for cover, something is being done different to provoke a different reaction. You give tarantulas far too much credit in their thinking capacity.And you oversimplify what is limited but not 1+1=2. Invertebrate responses are largely controlled by an additive process of stimulatory and inhibitory nerve impulses, unless you can control for every bit of input that might be taking place, it adds a "random" element you can't account for.

becca81
07-16-2005, 10:53 AM
<devil's advocate moment>
Depending on how you want to look at it, this could be seen as being wholely predictable. Not saying that is what DP had in mind, but I generally would consider Ts to be extremely predictable even though I agree 100% with the above statement. I know I'm going to get behaviour A, B, or C and I've got a feel for the probabilities of each; that is predictability of a kind, particularly since the range of possible behaviours is so limited.
</devil's advocate>

Yes, knowing the probabilities of the behavior happening is a kind of predictability. However, in the context of someone patting their P. murinus on the rump, I feel that it's fair to say that the response to that action is unpredictable. I feel that it's most likely that the spider will exhibit some sort of defense mechanism. However, one can't predict when this will happen (in this case, since the spider does not seem to be displaying stereotypical behaviors) due to the fact that we don't know the level of the perceived threat.

Since the range of possible behaviors is so limited, then of course the predictability of a tarantula's behaviors would be higher than that of an organism with a much larger range of behaviors (without getting into the statistics of any one behavior).

My main point in the initial post was that touching a spider in the described way (particulary the given species) was a risky decision because the person could not be assured that the spider would respond the same way each time it was touched.

To varying degrees, virtually everything is predictable.

becca81
07-16-2005, 10:56 AM
Which proves the point. With experience you can predict their movements on the stimulus you provide to them. If one day the tarantula decides to attack rather than run for cover, something is being done different to provoke a different reaction. You give tarantulas far too much credit in their thinking capacity.

I'm giving them very little credit - as stating that they are responding instinctually to their environment - not using higher thinking skills to respond.

We don't necessarily know what the difference is when a tarantula changes its behavior - there are variables that we are unaware of or have no control over.

king7
07-16-2005, 05:11 PM
nice OBT :)

mine is really really agresive :rolleyes:

Code Monkey
07-16-2005, 05:21 PM
Yes, knowing the probabilities of the behavior happening is a kind of predictability. However, in the context of someone patting their P. murinus on the rump, I feel that it's fair to say that the response to that action is unpredictable.Fair enough, and this would be why I don't pat any of my spiders on the rump except to get the usual "move along" response when goading them where I want them to go (and using a paint brush for those times you do get the "reach around" :))