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View Full Version : Experimenting with Macro Mode - Feedback Requested



becca81
07-15-2005, 05:28 PM
I just purchased a new camera which I know to have good macro abilities. I've been playing around with the features/settings, trying to learn how to use it best.

Here are some shots that I've recently taken while trying to use macro. They aren't as sharp/focused as I'd like them to be, but I'm not sure how to get the pictures that I'm wanting (yes, I've read the manual :)).

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/beccamillott/Brachypelma%20smithi/Fibonacci/P1000086.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/beccamillott/Brachypelma%20smithi/Fibonacci/P1000089.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/beccamillott/Aphonopelma%20hentzi/Vesalius/P1000055.jpg

Blasphemy
07-15-2005, 05:38 PM
Very nice shots...I think you're getting the hang of it rather quickly. What camera is it?

Socrates
07-15-2005, 05:39 PM
WOW - I personally love the pictures you've taken with your new camera, Becca. Very detailed, very focused, VERY nice.

May I ask what type of camera you purchased? (Our current digital is going on 4 years, and a new one is already on top of my Christmas list :D.)

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Wendy
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becca81
07-15-2005, 05:43 PM
It's a Panasonic DMC-FZ20. I spent quite some time looking at different cameras, reading professional reviews, asking questions from owners, etc. I wanted a camera that had manual settings available so that I could have more control over my pictures.

I feel like the pictures aren't bad for a first attempt, but I've still got a lot to learn about how everything works and what works best.

ink_scorpion
07-15-2005, 06:29 PM
One request...Crop them down a little and they'd be easier to view. They're Huge!!! :rolleyes:

becca81
07-15-2005, 06:40 PM
One request...Crop them down a little and they'd be easier to view. They're Huge!!! :rolleyes:

I realize that. I usually do resize all of my pictures, but for this purpose (feedback on the quality of the macro) it seemed more appropriate to leave them large.

edesign
07-15-2005, 08:32 PM
I realize that. I usually do resize all of my pictures, but for this purpose (feedback on the quality of the macro) it seemed more appropriate to leave them large.

my gf has a similar model...DMZ-F3ZPP, i forget the specs on it, a 4 or 5 megapixel i think. Anyway...it looks like you ahve it set to take them at 1600 pixels wide resolution, drop it to 1280 X 1024 and that should be fine. They only go off the edge of my screen (1280 resolution setting on my desktop) an inch or so so they're not too bad...but for someone using a lower resolution it could be a PIA :P They're experimental pics anyway ;)

nice pics...that's about as clear as i can get on my gf's but i don't have very steady hands (can't blame caffeine as i really don't take that much of it...). Your best bet is to get a tripod for it as with that mode even the slightest movement will blur it enough to ruin a good picture.

becca81
07-15-2005, 09:29 PM
I'm also trying to figure out how to use my photo program to help me out a little.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/beccamillott/Phormictopus%20cancerides/Number%20One/P1000069.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/beccamillott/Brachypelma%20smithi/Fibonacci/P1000078.jpg

edesign
07-15-2005, 10:36 PM
very nice...amazing the detail you can capture with macros.

But I fear these macro lenses bring a question to the forefront of the mind...when does this cross over in to insanity? At some point you will have zoom capabilities on your camera that rival dissecting microscopes or better! OH WHEN WILL IT END!

sorry...i passed sleepy a few days ago :P

Nick_schembri
07-16-2005, 04:32 AM
Very nice macro shots, you can even see little bits of fluff on the smithi

aaronrefalo
07-16-2005, 05:05 AM
nice once...i like when the identation of each hair comes out....

Aaron

Vys
07-16-2005, 05:44 AM
A tripod and super lighting focused right on the subject at hand is recommended. If you can't get a dying star right nearby, that's really a shame,but you might be able to pull if off with direct sunlight and at least 3 very powerful spotlights.
And don't even try photographing anything near surfaces that are quite adept at reflecting the light, such as white shiny plastic, or mostly translucent plastic.


Edesign: Hah, I believe it'll be a while, considering how wretchedly capricious digital cameras seem to be when it comes to focus; whether they decide to focus at all, despite the seemingly almost perfect conditions under which one is trying to make them do so, and if they should put the focus on that millimeter-high piece of root sticking up right at the edge of the picture instead of what you intended it to focus on, just to be right devils.

becca81
07-16-2005, 08:00 AM
A tripod and super lighting focused right on the subject at hand is recommended. If you can't get a dying star right nearby, that's really a shame,but you might be able to pull if off with direct sunlight and at least 3 very powerful spotlights.
And don't even try photographing anything near surfaces that are quite adept at reflecting the light, such as white shiny plastic, or mostly translucent plastic.



I think I'm going to set it up on a tripod later today and see what else I can do. I've been practicing with some things outside in natural light to see how I can play around with the settings.

I've been wondering about the background. Some of the pictures have been taken on a white background and it just doesn't turn out well. I may try to make some sort of artificial setup where I can take pictures.

The camera is "SLR-like" (which is not as good, of course, but it's more practical for me to be able to carry around with children) and I have the option of focusing manually. There's also an image stabilizer that is supposed to be very good.

I know the equipment is adequate, now I've got to focus on learning *how* to take good pictures.

C-R-A-Z-E-D
07-16-2005, 08:24 AM
Great shots becca what sp is the blue one ???? it looks awesome

becca81
07-16-2005, 08:34 AM
Great shots becca what sp is the blue one ???? it looks awesome

It's a P. cancerides sling. They don't keep the blue color as adults, though.

Vys
07-16-2005, 09:51 AM
I know the equipment is adequate, now I've got to focus on learning *how* to take good pictures.

Good sentence :)

Anyway, you're not suggesting a 'photography'-vivaria, are you? ;) I find that they look best against something dark, so that all the hairs are visible.

becca81
07-16-2005, 10:59 AM
Trying to use more natural light is helping with the amount of details that I'm able to see.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/beccamillott/Aphonopelma%20hentzi/Vesalius/P1000170.jpg

ChrisNCT
07-17-2005, 03:52 PM
Becca..nice pics.

It looks as though you are exceeding the "limit" of the focusing system by the blur that I see. Looks for the specs of the minimum focusing distance for that macro setting for your model of camera.

Are you using a manual focus or the auto focusing system?

Remember, without the right light, ISO and the shutter speed cranked up.....it is not hard to get blurry images with any cam.

Motion is a BIG factor when in macro settings!

Get a tripod and a wired or wireless remote for the camera if they are available for the model that you have. That would be a BIG plus!