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Cronoss
01-18-2003, 10:44 AM
this is my goliath pinkfoot
they look great at this stage.

Cronoss
01-18-2003, 10:45 AM
and another

MrT
01-18-2003, 12:06 PM
Wow,
That is a great looking T.
It should be call Pink foot. LOL
Sure is leggy. How big is it now? And how big do they get when full grown?

Ernie

Cronoss
01-18-2003, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by MrT
Wow,
That is a great looking T.
It should be call Pink foot. LOL
Sure is leggy. How big is it now? And how big do they get when full grown?

Ernie


I'm sorry it is a goliath pinkfoot.
that was a type-o
Bryan

Henry Kane
01-18-2003, 12:24 PM
Very nice! That second pic looks like there's about to be a kicking-storm. LOL! :)

Atrax

Cronoss
01-18-2003, 12:26 PM
Originally posted by Atrax
Very nice! That second pic looks like there's about to be a kicking-storm. LOL! :)

Atrax



You know it!!!

invertepet
01-18-2003, 03:22 PM
Here's one further on in years...

dennis
01-18-2003, 05:12 PM
Wow, they are truly amazing!!
Are they as 'agressive' as the T. Blondi? I do like the Blondi, and this one, but IMO I'm too unexperienced to keep those spiders...

Šennis

Tangled WWWeb
01-18-2003, 06:55 PM
Originally posted by dennie
Wow, they are truly amazing!!
Are they as 'agressive' as the T. Blondi? I do like the Blondi, and this one, but IMO I'm too unexperienced to keep those spiders...

Šennis

I have found T. apophysis to be very similar to T. blondi in most respects . IME they are a little more nervous and more prone to defensive behavior. I also find their urticating hairs to be more irritating than those of T. blondi.


John

invertepet
01-18-2003, 07:39 PM
I suspect some T. apophysis adult females could be more 'jittery' and prone to scooting around because they're just a bit more 'svelte' and leggier than bulkier, heavier T. blondi females.

Just my strictly un-scientific theory, mind you. ;)

bill

Tangled WWWeb
01-18-2003, 08:06 PM
Originally posted by invertepet
I suspect some T. apophysis adult females could be more 'jittery' and prone to scooting around because they're just a bit more 'svelte' and leggier than bulkier, heavier T. blondi females.

Just my strictly un-scientific theory, mind you. ;)

bill

That seems like a reasonable theory to me. It can make them a tad more 'interesting' to deal with though. I recently attempted to mate my mature male with my probably not so mature female. I may post the one photo I was able to get before I had to go running through the house after two of those "svelte" hair- kickers.:)

invertepet
01-18-2003, 09:12 PM
Wish me luck, then... Because I have the same thing planned for tonight! Here's our resident male.

petitegreeneyes
01-18-2003, 09:17 PM
Wow guys. I didn't realize that they get so pretty. Both of them are quite nice specimens of that species. Makes me want to add one to my collection.

Joy
01-18-2003, 10:10 PM
Originally posted by mmmmdonuts
this is my goliath pinkfoot
they look great at this stage.

I agree! There's nothing cuter than one of these little long-legged pink-footed babies, although I have been pleasantly surprised to see how attractive the mature specimens can be, too :)

Joy

Philth
01-18-2003, 10:28 PM
I just got one today. I cant wait for it to get bigger.

Bob the thief
01-18-2003, 10:39 PM
Odd I saw a few of them at a reptile show I was under the impression they looked almost exactly like T. blondis

Valael
01-19-2003, 04:22 AM
Yeah, most pictures I've seen make them look like a skinny, leggy T. Blondi.

But I guess lighting makes a lot of unseen colors come out.

invertepet
01-19-2003, 04:40 AM
Mature male T. apophysis display striking purple iridescence, one of the things that makes them stand out from their blondi cousins. The females do have long reddish-burgundy hairs on their legs, but as they get closer to their next molt and more brownish, those hairs blend in more and the morphologic differences become more important, like thinner, more spiny legs and more elongate or ovoid cephalothorax.

bill